The two-beat groove

Delve into Wynton Marsalis’s six-part Harvard University lecture series, covering various topics, including jazz, what it means to be American, and the importance of cultural literacy and the arts in liberal arts education. XVII. Syncopation- Expect the Unexpected In this chapter, Wynton explains how syncopation challenges convention.

Wynton at Harvard, Chapter 20: Blues Fundamentals

Delve into Wynton Marsalis’s six-part Harvard University lecture series, covering a range of topics including jazz, what it means to be American, and the importance of cultural literacy and the arts in the liberal arts education.

XX. Blues Fundamentals

In this chapter, Wynton argues why “the blues is a train,” signifying freedom.

Go to jazz.org/wyntonatharvard for the complete series.

Wynton Marsalis at Harvard HD image

These Harvard-sponsored teachings by Wynton Marsalis and orchestra is a required lesson for Durham Cool readers. You will not find a more informed, charismatic, experienced, and humorous professor than Wynton.

In April 2011, Wynton Marsalis launched “Hidden in Plain View: Meanings in American Music,” a three-year performance and lecture series at Harvard University. The six lecture series began with “Music as Metaphor,” an interpretation of the many unobserved symbols in American music and their illumination of the democratic process. They featured performances by Marsalis alongside Ali Jackson (drums), Dan Nimmer (piano), Walter Blanding (tenor sax), Carlos Henriquez (bass), James Chirillo (guitar and banjo), and Mark O’Connor (violin).

Music as Metaphor Wynton Marsalis at Harvard

Performances by Marsalis’s ensemble (with a special guest, the iconic fiddler Mark O’Connor) punctuate the lecture with musical explanations.

Mark O’Connor – fiddle
Walter Blanding – reeds
James Chirillo – guitar
Dan Nimmer – piano
Carlos Henriquez – bass
Ali Jackson – drums

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Wynton at Harvard, Chapter 1: Music and Meaning

 

Delve into Wynton Marsalis’s six-part Harvard University lecture series, covering a range of topics including jazz, what it means to be American, and the importance of cultural literacy and the arts in liberal arts education. I. Music and Meaning In this chapter, Wynton introduces his ‘Me vs. You’ and ‘Us vs. Y’all’ vs. ‘All of Us’ contention and argues that music has the significant power to bring us together and evoke moods and memories. Go to jazz.org/wyntonatharvard for the complete series. “Hidden in Plain View: Meanings in American Music” is a series of six lectures delivered at Harvard University between 2011 and 2014 and sponsored by the Office of the President and Provost. The inaugural lecture, “Music as Metaphor,” was delivered in Sanders Theatre to a capacity crowd. It is an interpretation of the many unobserved symbols in American music and an investigation into how they illuminate the democratic process. It covers many of the fundamental devices, forms, and songs that bind the different Americas together at the root. It is Marsalis’s contention that “‘Me vs. You’ and ‘Us vs. Y’all’—vs. ‘All of Us’—remains the struggle at the heart of humankind and the central debate of our Constitution. How do we achieve a common ground when individual victories are so much more valued? This conundrum has been resolved harmoniously in our musical arts for more than a century. Under the vibrant din of our democracy, on the lower frequencies, sonic metaphors speak to and for us all. What they tell us about what it means to be American could serve us well in these divisive and uncivil times.” Performances by Marsalis’s ensemble (with a special guest, the iconic fiddler Mark O’Connor) punctuate the lecture with musical explanations. Mark O’Connor – fiddle Walter Blanding – reeds James Chirillo – guitar Dan Nimmer – piano Carlos Henriquez – bass Ali Jackson – drums

Wynton Marsalis at Harvard HD image

These Harvard-sponsored teachings by Wynton Marsalis and orchestra are required curricula for Durham Cool readers.  You will not find a more knowledgeable, charismatic, experienced, and humorous professor than Wynton.

The Cool Media team has watched the entire series.  Truly inspirational even for those nonmusicians on our team.

Miles and John Coltrane
Miles Davis quartet
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Wynton at Harvard: “Hidden in Plain View: Meanings in American Music”

Videos 1-26

“Hidden in Plain View: Meanings in American Music” is a series of six lectures delivered at Harvard University between 2011 and 2014 and sponsored by the Office of the President and Provost. The inaugural lecture, “Music as Metaphor,” was delivered to a capacity crowd in Sanders Theatre. It interprets the many unobserved symbols in American music and investigates how they illuminate the democratic process. It covers many fundamental devices, forms, and songs that bind the different Americas together at the root. Marsalis contends, ” ‘Me vs. You and ‘Us vs. Y’all’—vs. ‘All of Us’—remains the struggle at the heart of humankind and the central debate of our Constitution. How do we achieve a common ground when individual victories are much more valued? This problem has been resolved harmoniously in our musical arts for over a century. Under the vibrant din of our democracy, on the lower frequencies, sonic metaphors speak to and for us all. What they tell us about what it means to be American could serve us well in these divisive and uncivil times.” Performances by Marsalis’s ensemble (with a special guest, the iconic fiddler Mark O’Connor) punctuate the lecture with musical explanations. Mark O’Connor – fiddle Walter Blanding – reeds James Chirillo – guitar Dan Nimmer – piano Carlos Henriquez – bass Ali Jackson – drums

Wynton at Harvard, Chapter 18: The Melting Pot

 

 

Essentially Ellington 2019: Q&A with WYNTON MARSALIS

Essentially Ellington 2019 High School Jazz Band Competition & Festival Q&A with WYNTON MARSALIS Thursday, May 9, 2019

Wynton at Harvard, Chapter 6: Approaches to Improvisation

 

Episode 1: Skain’s Domain (March 23, 2020)

Delve into Wynton Marsalis’s six-part Harvard University lecture series, covering a range of topics including jazz, what it means to be American, and the importance of cultural literacy and the arts in the liberal arts education. XVIII. The Melting Pot In this chapter, Wynton explains why “the blues is the melting pot of America.” Go to jazz.org/wyntonatharvard for the complete series. “Hidden in Plain View: Meanings in American Music” is a series of six lectures delivered at Harvard University between 2011 and 2014 sponsored by the Office of the President and Provost. The inaugural lecture, “Music as Metaphor,” was delivered in Sanders Theatre to a capacity crowd. It is an interpretation of the many unobserved symbols in American music and an investigation into how they illuminate the democratic process. It covers many of the fundamental devices, forms, and songs that bind the different Americas together at the root. It is Marsalis’s contention that “‘Me vs. You’ and ‘Us vs. Y’all’—vs. ‘All of Us’—remains the struggle at the heart of humankind and the central debate of our Constitution. How do we achieve a common ground when individual victories are so much more valued? This conundrum has been resolved harmoniously in our musical arts for more than a century. Under the vibrant din of our democracy, on the lower frequencies, sonic metaphors speak to and for us all. What they tell us about what it means to be American could serve us well in these divisive and uncivil times.” Performances by Marsalis’s ensemble (with a special guest, the iconic fiddler Mark O’Connor) punctuate the lecture with musical explanations. Mark O’Connor – fiddle Walter Blanding – reeds James Chirillo – guitar Dan Nimmer – piano Carlos Henriquez – bass Ali Jackson – drums

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Ellis Marsalis Memorial

On May 15, family and friends gathered in New Orleans’ Gallier Hall to remember the late pianist, composer, and educator Ellis Marsalis.

 

 

Music in this video

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Is the BMPCC 4K still worth it in 2021? | STOP ASKING

 

There seems to be an influx of videos on YouTube asking if "the BMPCC4K is still worth it." It's time to stop asking. In this video, we cover why it's still worth it in 2021 and for the next 5 years. What do you think?

BMPCC4K 2022 | Best budget cinema camera for filmmakers

 

Should you buy the Black magic pocket cinema camera 4k in 2022? Well, it depends. This is my journey and process on how I came to decide that is was the best camera for me and my budget. I've been using the BMPCC4K for over 6 months now so here are my thoughts.

A budding filmmaker like you needs the Blackmagic Pocket 4k VS Hollywood Movie Camera | Red Dragon

 

BMPCC 4K Review - I spent one year with the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema 4K, am I still in love?

BMPCC 4K Review - I spent one year with the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema 4K, am I still in love? Another BMPCC 4K Review?! I didn't just buy the Pocket 4K and use it for a week. I used the BMPCC 4K for a full year before producing this in-depth camera review on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema 4K to provide my fellow filmmakers with the knowledge they need before you purchase the Pocket 4K. Find out why in 2020, I think the BMPCC 4K is the best value cinema camera for filmmakers like you. Learn how I put this entry-level cinema camera to the test when it comes to filmmaking and videography work in the field. In this 1-year review, I also show you some BMPCC4K Footage that I've shot, as well as show you some low-light footage from the BMPCC 4K.