Yale’s solar array at West Campus has 4,400 panels, covering nearly two acres of rooftop.

Climate Change and Health: From Science to Action Specialization

 

On Coursera by Yale University

Address adverse health impacts of climate change. Learn how climate change negatively affects human health, what adaptation strategies can lessen the impacts, and how to communicate effectively about these issues to bring about change in your community.

Climate change is arguably the greatest public health threat we face. To address it successfully, health and environmental professionals, advocates, and others need to acquire new skills and a deeper understanding of its challenges and solutions. This specialization is for those who wish to understand the impact of climate change on health and are committed to protecting the health of populations using the knowledge and skills they will acquire.

offered by Yale.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

Describe how and why the climate is changing and is predicted to change in the future

Understand how climate change negatively impacts human health

Plan for at least one practical adaptation activity that increases a community’s resilience to the health effects of climate change

Communicate health-related risks of climate change effectively to the public & policymakers & motivate positive changes in climate-related behaviors

 

Robert Dubrow

Robert Dubrow

 

 

Bio

Dr. Dubrow has been heavily involved in the educational mission of the Yale School of Public Health, as well as in research. Moved by what he sees as the greatest public health challenge in this century, Dr. Dubrow has committed himself to a new direction of education, training, and research on climate change and health.

He serves as Faculty Director for a new Climate Change and Health Initiative at Yale School of Public Health, which aims to 1) create a cohort of leaders dedicated to addressing climate change and health; 2) establish an educational program on climate change and health for students across the University; 3) catalyze research on climate change and health utilizing Yale’s multidisciplinary expertise to generate innovative interventions and policy prescriptions; and 4) utilize public health science to support legislative, litigative, regulatory, executive, community, and other efforts to mitigate or adapt to climate change and to achieve climate justice. Dr. Dubrow serves on the Advisory Board of Cool Effect, a program that identifies some of the best carbon emission reduction projects in the world and makes it simple for supporters to donate. Dr. Dubrow has taught both Principles of Epidemiology I and Principles of Epidemiology II and was chosen by the Classes of 2002, 2007, and 2012 to be Teacher of the Year. He co-Chaired the Yale School of Public Health Accreditation Advisory Committee, which oversaw the School’s self-study process leading up to its successful 7-year re-accreditation by the Council on Education for Public Health in 2014. Historically, Dr. Dubrow’s research has focused on cancer, HIV, and their intersection. Most recently, his research has focused on two distinct areas: glioma (the main form of brain cancer) and HIV-related malignancies. He is currently developing a research and public health practice program in the area of climate change and health.

 

 

 

 

 
#NatureNow, a new short film narrated by Greta Thunberg and political journalist, author and activist George Monbiot, serves as a call to action to protect, restore and fund #NaturalClimateSolutions. Credits: Tom Mustill/ www.grippingfilms.com
 

 

Protect the Tongass National Forest

 

The first step on what you can do to positively impact climate change is awareness of the CRISIS.

Next, make low carbon footprint changes in your household.  Keep your commitments to change.

Next, influence friends and family outside of your immediate household, by modeling low carbon footprint behaviors.

 

Today I urge you to join me with a phone call and email to Sen Lisa Murkowski as the timber industry has a leg up on all of us. 

Records show federal government, tasked with rewriting Tongass rules, also funded Alaska timber group

 

 

Keep the Roadless Rule in place on the Tongass National Forest!

What is the Roadless Rule?

The Roadless Rule has protected National Forests across the United States since 2001. It prevents new road construction, maintaining some of the last old-growth forests in the world. Parts of the Tongass National Forest are currently protected under the Roadless Rule.

The State of Alaska is trying to return to the days of clear cut logging by making the Tongass exempt from the Roadless Rule.

We are currently waiting for the Forest Service to open up a comment period. Sign up for our action alert newsletter so that you can voice your concerns about keeping the Roadless Rule on the Tongass once the comment period opens.

(click on the button above to sign up for action alert newsletter and find out more about how you can Take Action to Protect the Tongass (some of the last old Growth Forest in the world).

Humans, when confronted with big problems (obstacles) to overcome engage in two common responses, avoidance, and more AVOIDANCE. Climate change is an active, rapidly changing this lifetime issue for all of us yet it seems so many of us are living lives like nothing is wrong. Why? This is a normal human response when confronted with a problem too big to solve by one of us. Imagine you had a place to go to for realistic solutions and to hear from leading scientists and activists like Greta Thunberg.  Working on this problem is the work of all earthlings.   You can start today with the simple act of avoiding all forms of unnecessary travel.

“There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose characters strive for ostensibly reachable goals and, tragically or amusingly, never manage to get any closer to them. But it seems to me, in our rapidly darkening world, that the converse of Kafka’s quip is equally true: There is no hope, except for us.

I’m talking, of course, about climate change. The struggle to rein in global carbon emissions and keep the planet from melting down has the feel of Kafka’s fiction. The goal has been clear for thirty years, and despite earnest efforts, we’ve made essentially no progress toward reaching it. Today, the scientific evidence verges on irrefutable. If you’re younger than sixty, you have a good chance of witnessing the radical destabilization of life on earth—massive crop failures, apocalyptic fires, imploding economies, epic flooding, hundreds of millions of refugees fleeing regions made uninhabitable by extreme heat or permanent drought. If you’re under thirty, you’re all but guaranteed to witness it.” (1)

(1)

The climate apocalypse is coming. To prepare for it, we need to admit that we can’t prevent it.

This morning, a Microsoft partnership with Nature Conservancy with a goal of planting 1 Billion trees, popped up on my computer.  Please join me in donating $1 or more to this noble effort.

Protecting our planet

Over the last 45 years, 60% of the world’s wildlife has disappeared. And each year, 32 million acres of the world’s forests are depleted.
– The Nature Conservancy

We’re facing unprecedented challenges from climate change: pollution, flooding, drought, loss of biodiversity, and a rapidly growing population of almost eight billion people. Lives, livelihoods, and natural resources hang in the balance.

But there’s still hope to reverse the damaging cycles we’ve created. Together, we can work to ensure a safer, healthier, and more sustainable future for our planet.

Multiple studies published in a peer-reviewed scientific journals1 show that 97 percent or more of actively publishing climate scientists agree*: Climate-warming trends over the past century are extremely likely due to human activities. In addition, most of the leading scientific organizations worldwide have issued public statements endorsing this position. The following is a partial list of these organizations, along with links to their published statements and a selection of related resources.

Overwhelmed with the consequences of inaction or business as usual? You are not alone. This is a big issue that confronts us and it is human nature to find a way of avoiding this very big human-created climate change concern. Too big a problem to solve on your own?   The time for inaction has long since passed and we have no time to waste on “not trying”. This article includes verifiable evidence of the state of our climate on Planet Earth. If you’re still not persuaded, please click on the button below for NASA.GOV scientific consensus. This article also includes a viable potential solution from Tom Chi. I urge you to watch and listen to the videos from Greta and Tom Chi and act now.

Scientific Consensus

 

here is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose characters strive for ostensibly reachable goals and, tragically or amusingly, never manage to get any closer to them. But it seems to me, in our rapidly darkening world, that the converse of Kafka’s quip is equally true: There is no hope, except for us.

I’m talking, of course, about climate change. The struggle to rein in global carbon emissions and keep the planet from melting down has the feel of Kafka’s fiction. The goal has been clear for thirty years, and despite earnest efforts, we’ve made essentially no progress toward reaching it. Today, the scientific evidence verges on irrefutable. If you’re younger than sixty, you have a good chance of witnessing the radical destabilization of life on earth—massive crop failures, apocalyptic fires, imploding economies, epic flooding, hundreds of millions of refugees fleeing regions made uninhabitable by extreme heat or permanent drought. If you’re under thirty, you’re all but guaranteed to witness it.

 

(3 Dec 2018) A Swedish teenager, who takes time out of school each week to highlight the danger of global warming, says world leaders who are skipping a UN climate summit are “very irresponsible”.

Fifteen-year-old Greta Thunberg traveled to Poland for the start of the two-week talks and delivered a speech on Monday to some of the decision-makers at the conference.
Speaking afterward, Thunberg said the absence of leaders such as US President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel “shows what they prioritize”.
Thunberg, who protests outside the Swedish parliament every Friday, said of politicians not in attendance: “In the future, we will look back, and we will either laugh at them or we will hate them.”
Her activism has inspired other students from as far away as Australia.

http://ScientistsWarning.TV/ – Today our little climate giant, Greta Thunberg, is joined by her father, Svante to talk about her path from an unknown Swedish school girl to an internationally recognized climate leader. If governments don’t give a damn about her future, why should she give a damn about their laws! Svante discusses how Greta’s passion for the truth about climate has changed the family’s lives. Very compelling.

As government ministers from around the globe gather in Katowice, Poland, for the final days of the 24th U.N. climate summit, we speak with 15-year-old activist Greta Thunberg, who denounced politicians here last week for their inaction on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. She has garnered global attention for carrying out a weekly school strike against climate change in her home country of Sweden. “We need to change ourselves now, because tomorrow it might be too late,” says Thunberg. We are also joined by her father, Svante Thunberg, a Swedish actor.

 

 

Teen Climate Activist, Greta Thunberg

 

https://www.ted.com/tedx

 

 

Greta Thunberg realized at a young age the lapse in what several climate experts were saying and in the actions that were being taken in society. The difference was so drastic in her opinion that she decided to take matters into her own hands. Greta is a 15-year-old Stockholm native who lives at home with her parents and sister Beata. She’s a 9th grader in Stockholm who enjoys spending her spare time riding Icelandic horses, spending time with her families two dogs, Moses and Roxy. She loves animals and has a passion for books and science. At a young age, she became interested in the environment and convinced her family to adopt a sustainable lifestyle. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

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